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Thursday, 31 October 2019

Tying a Blue & Partridge Wet, Soft Hackle Fly with Davie McPhail

The Blue Partridge originated as a river pattern in the North of England but using the original’s blueprint this fly has changed and evolved into a small stream and Stillwater favourite. The book that Davie McPhail references is Pritt’s 1985 "Yorkshire Trout Flies", where he remarks that this pattern is “A first-rate killer in biggish water any time after the middle of May.’

This Partridge and Blue, sometimes know as the Gravelbed is featured in many North Country fly lists, it’s a versatile spider pattern that can be tied in a selection of different colours as shown by Davie with his variant collection to cover hatches all through the season.

All of the materials needed to tie this fly are available from Glasgow Angling Centre as listed below, but as always, if you need any help finding materials or substitutes then we'll be happy to help. Time to tie a Blue Partridge Wet, Soft Hackle Fly, with the guidance of Davie McPhail.




Materials Used:
Hook: Fulling Mill All-Purpose Medium size 14 Thread: Blue Pearsall's Silk or Sub Body: Grey Natural Dubbing Hackle: Grey Partridge

Additional materials: Additionally, Davie made use of Varnish, which he applied to the thread after completing the fly.

Davie's preferred type of whip finish tool can be found HERE!

Thursday, 24 October 2019

Tying the Morton & Gold Wet Fly with Davie McPhail

Fly fishing using Wet Flies is the most traditional and still very effective method of fly fishing for Trout and Grayling. Swinging or pulling wets will imitate a huge range of aquatic and terrestrial insects, from Beetles to Sedges but a number of the Silver and Gold bodied Wet Flies such as the "Morton & Gold" Davie is tying here are fantastic emulations of Small Fry.

If you're looking to tie up some winged wets for Grayling over the winter or filling your box ready for the Brown Trout next season, Davie's simple steps will help you get them just right.

All of the materials needed to tie this fly are available from Glasgow Angling Centre as listed below, but as always, if you need any help finding materials or substitutes then we'll be happy to help. Time to tie a Morton & Gold Wet Fly, with the guidance of Davie McPhail.




Materials Used:
Hook: Fulling Mill All-Purpose Medium size 12 Thread: Uni-8/0 Black Tail: Black Cock Hackle Fibres Rib: Gold Wire Body: Gold Tinsel Hackle: Black Hen Natural or Dyed Wing: Green Breast Feather from a Lady Amherst

Additional materials: Additionally, Davie made use of Varnish, which he applied to the thread after completing the fly.

Davie's preferred type of whip finish tool can be found HERE!

Thursday, 17 October 2019

Tying a Bootlace Dun Dry Fly with Davie McPhail

If you have ever wondered why it's called the 'Bootlace Dun' then Davie McPhail has answered your question. Post wing style patterns are commonly tied using polypropylene (sic) yarn or CDC these days but some were traditionally tied using brushed fibres from bootlaces to form the wing of the Dun. If you've got a bootlace going spare, Davie will show you how to turn it into a superb all-rounder, although they are simple in making and appearance, they are surprisingly effective, especially with Grayling in the Winter. As Davie McPhail explains, Trout will take these little flies and Grayling love them as well. With winter fast approaching, it's a great time to start tying a few colour variants of this little fly.

All of the materials needed to tie this fly are available from Glasgow Angling Centre as listed below, but as always, if you need any help finding materials or substitutes then we'll be happy to help. Time to tie a Bootlace Dun Dry Fly, with the guidance of Davie McPhail.




Materials Used:
Hook: Tiemco 2487BL size 20 to 24 Thread: Uni -8/0 Lt.Cahill Tail: Yellow Micro Fibbetts Body: Yellow Dubbing Wing: Dark.Grey Boot or Shoelace
Alternative Wing: Polypropylene Floating Yarn

Additional materials: Additionally, Davie made use of Varnish, which he applied to the thread after completing the fly.

Davie's preferred type of whip finish tool can be found HERE!

Thursday, 3 October 2019

Nymphing on The River Tummel


So on a recent Monday morning Cuillin and Callum from our Edinburgh Store headed to the River Tummel in the hope of landing a few more Brown Trout before the season ends, and with a bit of luck, Callum’s first Grayling.


Long Run on the River Tummel


 They started off the day just outside Ballyoukan after picking up permits from the Ballinluig service stop, and with nothing rising they both decided to start swinging a team of wet flies down and across fairly fast flowing water. Callum was first off the mark with a beautifully coloured Brownie that took a liking to the hares ear spider he had as his point fly.




Cuillin didn’t take long to get amongst the fish either, landing two Trout and a nice Grayling in quick succession. His first fish came on swung wets, and the other two as he switched to another rod set up with the trio; a buoyant dry fly on the first dropper to act as an indicator, with two heavy tungsten nymphs spaced equally below.

This method can be deadly in the right conditions due to the fact that you’re able to drift your nymphs deep and at range, even in fast water, watching for the inevitable plummet of your dry as a Trout snatches one the nymphs below.





The trio had worked well for Cuillin and accordingly Callum switched over to the same set up. Shortly afterwards Callum had two nice Trout and was pleased with his success on a method that was new to him. 




As they’d now covered a good amount of water, they decided to walk downstream to see if they could find some faster water for Cuillin to run through on a French Nymphing set up.
Brownie Taken on French Nymph Setup


This method involves suspending a team of nymphs under a ‘sighter’, a coloured section of mono used for bite indication, and fishing them under the rod tip. This allows you to dead drift your flies through fast water, striking at any movement on your sighter.




Cuillin took another two small Brownies and dropped one, so they decided to walk back upstream to the slower water in the hopes of finding a few more fish for Callum before the end of the day.

Unfortunately the bite died off and interest in any tactics seemed to have disappeared by this point, with just one more one more fish coming to a wets swung down and across through faster water.

Overall it was a very enjoyable day, with success on a variety of methods, and Callum's looking forward to another chance at catching his Grayling over the winter period.

Setups:

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